SHOULD ELECTIONS POINT TO VIOLENCE?

“………Why should an act of democracy be the same that takes people’s lives or one that dents the country’s history and its development?………”

Recently, a team of Ugandans visited one of the organizations I work with and after debriefing them about the vision  and mission  of the institution, they couldn’t help but ask about the election mood in the country.  The question was prompted by a mention of one of the pillars of the organization – governance and rights. They had though in Rwanda no local organization intervenes in governance and human rights  related issues.  With just less than 2 months to go to the polls, our visitors were surprised that there are no billboards advertising the presidential candidates or even that the city is not polluted with the loud campaigns or even flyers and brochures showing the flashy manifestos of the aspirants. They had just witnessed the primaries of the ruling party that were held in a peaceful and non-chaotic manner, contrary to what had happened in Kenya this April, a process that was marred by either kidnaps, injuries, accusations of seeking sympathy votes or even malpractices, causing fear that Kenya’s history of election violence may repeat itself, according to observers. Another friend from UK lured me into a conversation on elections and his fear was that back in the UK, the election turnout would be low (according to recent reports, he might have been right – only 68.7 %.) Well I am not here to compare the affairs of the nations, every country has its own challenges but I was taken into a moment of asking a question that I think we all need to ponder about: Do elections mean violence? Why should an act of democracy be the same that takes people’s lives or one that dents the country’s history and its development?

Some people have gotten so greedy for power that they don’t want to let go while others are so slobbering to be in command that they don’t mind the lives they have to leave on the way to their self-acclaimed glory. Oh my God!!!! Don’t these people know that they can do a lot out of the office? Most heroes didn’t have to first be presidents or cabinet ministers nor did they hold parliamentary seats to cause change in their communities – they just used what they had. All it needs is a remarkable drive and commitment to create a better world through community service.

Anyway my intention of writing this article wasn’t to tell you about how to effect change without necessarily being in the government but to ponder on how our nations can keep the election processes peaceful for the sake of the people they claim they want to serve. People everywhere deserve and rightly expect a pleasant and safe environment in which they can live and work. We all want good quality public services, with rising standards in our schools and in our health care institutions. We want local communities where everyone can participate in society, and effective care is available to those who need it. You can argue if you wish but it’s only that selfless leader who will work tooth and nail to ensure that the people live in a peaceful setting, they can even step down if the safety of the people is guaranteed. Therefore, as different people head to the polls this year, let me use this platform in my authority as a human rights activist to urge all to exercise their right to cast their vote and not allow to be intimidated in to voting any candidate that they don’t favor.  Also to our aspirants, we are here to hold you accountable for your decisions, walk away peacefully if you lose and serve the people if you win.

Elections don’t have to point to violence but to a pacific transition of power.

 

 

COMMITMENT TO THE FIGHT AGAINST GENOCIDE

I am back with another piece on genocide, not only because we as Rwandans are in the 3 month commemoration period of the genocide against Tutsi but because being at the helm of an organization that is hinged on the history of our country, gives me a drive to steer conversations about peace, good governance and genocide prevention. In this piece, I am drawing focus on three elements that can contribute to a sustainable fight against a replay of genocide anywhere in the world.

  • The respect for the dignity of each and every human being by combating all forms of discrimination, racism and exclusion can prevent genocide.
  • In our education systems and in schools, history should be emphasized as a way to avoid the mistakes of the past.
  • Empower critical thinking among the young and encourage active citizenry so as avoid blind following

Genocides are often carried out in a manner where one group of the society wants to exterminate another group. This in many cases is perceived as the struggle against political, economic and social marginalization and discrimination of ethnic, racial, religious or political inclinations. Although it is difficult to anticipate the critical moment at which genocide will begin or the scope that the massacre will take, it’s imperative to examine and interpret the warning signs and respond to them adequately. If one group is continuously discriminated against, they will start by resenting the system, then start forming opposition groups, then resort to organizing illegal or unknown meetings with others who are tired of a dire situation, from there, they develop a determination to end it once at for all, no matter the extent to which they have to go to. Considering that all human beings are equal before the law and are entitled to equal protection of the law against any discrimination and against any incitement to discrimination, any nation should treat all citizens equal in a bid to avoid a potential genocide.

Secondly, education is an important medium of acquiring skills and knowledge. A common saying notes that our education begins at home, but thereafter, as we grow we go to schools, colleges and other educational institutions. School education lays the foundation stone for the child’s future. As years go by after the genocide against Tutsis happened in Rwanda, a new generation that has no idea about the brutality of genocide is born. The best way to keep them informed and committed to Never Again is if they know the history of their country.  The more the young generation knows about their past and how it darkened and silenced the country, the more they will renew their commitment and intensify their efforts against genocide. Education can play a great role in a given society as a means of conflict prevention.

The aspect of critical thinking is both an education element and a trained skill. If the young ones acquire this skill, they will involve in active citizenry and thus know when they are manipulated or lied to. In this case, critical thinking constitutes the ability to integrate and evaluate information, that is looking at a conflict and see the similarities between it and previous conflicts, related or unrelated. The individual can then resolve the conflict using resolutions that have worked or adopt strategies that can prevent a potential fatal conflict or violence. A critical thinker can’t be just lured to hold a machete for the sake of ethnic clinging, they would questions the approach, they would weigh in to the impacts, and they will ask if there is no other way to resolve rather than opting to blood shedding.

I can’t say that these are the best mechanisms to preventing genocide, but these complemented with other approaches can promise a genocide free world.

Special dedication of this blog goes to the the millions of innocent children, women, and men who have suffered and died from the genocide against the Tutsi. It’s a reiteration that we shall do everything in our capacity not to let the genocide happen again in Rwanda but also to collaborate with other key stakeholders globally to prevent any genocide anywhere in the world.